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Samovar Tea Lounge in San Francisco

Mel Hattie
Mel Hattie
2 min read
Samovar Tea Lounge in San Francisco

Samovar tea lounge in San Francisco is exactly how you’d expect Silicon Valley would do tea. Not with fancy tech and gadgets. Oh no, that would be too on the nose. But, with precisely catalogued organic offerings, and almost scientifically perfected food pairings. My ‘green ecstasy’ matcha-sencha fusion arrived in a glass vessel reminiscent of a beaker.

Samovar at Yerba Buena Gardens

I visited the Yerba Buena Gardens location, but Samovar Tea Lounge locations can be found throughout San Francisco. Founder Jesse Jacob envisioned Samovar as an ‘alternate reality’ where we are invited to slow down and disconnect.

Samovar's restaurant and tea lounge at the Yerba Buena Gardens located in the heart of San Francisco.

Samovar was an incredibly beautiful place, with great service, tea sommeliers who really knew their stuff, and offered a prime product in a premium location for a price tag that matched.

Details

Sandwiches and small eats were around $10-$15. Food and tea service was $20-$25. Not all of their locations have full-service restaurants. You can check out Samovar's location list to find out which ones have food and which are more cafe-style.

The tea quality was great, and they even have big pots of chai at some locations that lend warm cardamom, cinnamon, ginger, black pepper, and star anise smells to the air.

I appreciate the little touches—the excellent copywriting on the menu, the wasabi in their Caesar salad dressing paired with wild smoked salmon.

I found dry tea here to purchase on the expensive side, with not as much information about sourcing readily available as I would have liked. Part of me wonders if that’s just me getting used to American prices again. It’s comparable to some of what I’ve had in New York.

Green ecstasy from Samovar Tea Lounge

Samovar’s use of tea blending is a unique touch and something that stood out to me most about the location. I tried Green Ecstasy, a first-flush Asamushi-style Japanese sencha blended with matcha from Kagoshima. Asamushi-style just means the leaves are only briefly steamed (20-40 seconds), are usually low in tannins (less bitterness), and have a vegetal taste like fresh grass.

The matcha gives a nice caffeine boost to this green tea and has a rich and brothy mouthfeel that is very energizing and gives a ‘full’ feeling. As it should be, they brew this tea at a lower temperature to avoid scalding the delicate green tea leaves.

If brewing at home, I recommend you brew in a Japanese kyusu teapot and then into a serving jar like the one in this photo.

This tea also lends itself well to re-steeping. I recommend a short, 10-second infusion for the first brew, then increasing your steep time by 10 seconds more for each subsequent infusion.

Tea